Guidelines for Integrating Gender-Based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Action

Reducing risk, promoting resilience and aiding recovery

Information Management

This page lists all recommended tools and guidance on the identification, analysis, and monitoring of GBV risks. This includes assessment, analysis, and monitoring. This page will be updated overtime to reflect updated method and tools.

First you will find overarching guidance, explaining what GBV risk analysis is, and what types of information are  overarching documents with explanation on GBV risk analysis and collection data for GBV risks, followed by tools and guidance on collecting data for GBV risks according to different data collection techniques.

Overarching Guidance

Prior to using any guidance and tools on collecting data for GBV risks, please first read the overarching documents.

  1. GBV risk analysis guidance: this document outlines what GBV risk analysis is, and what types of information you should look for
  2. GBV risk analysis indicator matrix: The indicator matrix lists indicators/research questions for identifying and analyzing GBV risks in different sectors.

Methods for Analyzing, Identifying, and Monitoring GBV Risks

GBV risk mitigation occurs across the whole humanitarian programme cycle. Thus, like any HPC starts at the needs assessment and analysis stage, risk mitigation starts at identification and analysis.   First read the guidance on safe collection of GBV risks data. There are different ways to identify, analyze, and subsequently monitor GBV risks. On this page, guidance and tools for four different data collection techniques are listed. You can choose one data collection technique to collect data to help identify GBV risks, and monitor the situation overtime using the same data collection technique periodically. However, the data collection techniques are not mutually exclusive and you can use different techniques combined to obtain a coherent picture on the operational environment and GBV risks.

For example, Focus Group Discussions are always recommended as they can be used to better understand women’s and girls’ views and opinions. Combined with other data collection techniques, this can give you a more well-rounded analysis

Focus Group Discussions

Focus group discussions are a great way to consult with affected communities, and a good way to consult with women and girls. What makes them stand out from other data collection techniques, is that in FGDs one can specifically have groups of women and girls talk about their opinions, experience, concerns, and have their voices be heard. In other large-scale needs assessments, such as large-scale key informant interviews or household surveys, women and girls may have less options to participate.

The tools and guidance listed here include the following:

  1. A quick FGD guide in relation to GBV risk analysis
  2. Consultations tipsheet
  3. Tips for conducting Focus Group Discussions
  4. Example FGD tool that can be adapted

Safety Audits

A safety audit is based on visual observation as a means of assessing GBV risks related to a physical structure and layout, resource availability, and provision of humanitarian services and assistance. Observation may be combined with other data collection techniques, such as key informant interviews or focus group discussions, to create a more in-depth overview of safety and possible (GBV) risks.

The tools and guidance listed here include the following:

  1. A quick safety audit guide in relation to GBV risk analysis
  2. Safety audit: full ‘how to’ guide
  3. Safety audit checklist
  4. Safety audit example tool – multisectoral
  5. Safety audit example tool – nutrition
  6. Safety audit example tool - WASH

Key Informant Interviews

Key informant interviews can give both quantitative and qualitative data. A key informant interview can be done with experts (e.g. humanitarian staff) or members of the community (e.g. community leaders). Sometimes, key informant interviews are done in a more targeted manner for programme evaluation (e.g. a key informant interview with a service user).

In some humanitarian contexts, large-scale assessment using key informant interviews (e.g. DTM from IOM) may be a key information source for the HPC. This is why in guidance there will be an additional focus on integrating questions into this assessment.

The tools and guidance listed here include the following:

  1. A quick KII guide in relation to GBV risk analysis
  2. Guidance on integrating GBV and risk mitigation into DTM (large-scale KII)
  3. KII example tool

Household Surveys

A household survey is a questionnaire that is obtained by interview the (usually) head of household, or a person who can response on behalf of the household and its members.

Generally, standalone household surveys only for the purposes of identifying GBV risks are not undertaken. Rather, safe to ask questions on risks are usually integrated into existing household surveys. In some humanitarian contexts, large-scale assessment using household surveys (e.g. MSNA from REACH) may be a key information source for the HPC. This is why in the guidance and tools there will be an additional focus on integrating questions into this assessment.

The tools and guidance listed here include the following:

  1. A quick HH survey guide in relation to GBV risk analysis
  2. An example HH survey (post-distribution monitoring guide) that includes examples of indicators on GBV risks integrated into the survey
  3. An example tool for HH survey that includes questions that can help identify/monitor GBV risks

This site is always being updated, so please check back often for new additions, tools, and resources!

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